Important: Our WhatsApp number is changing from +61 2 7908 3995 to +44 20 3608 8443 due to technical reasons

CHCECE038 Observe Children To Inform Practice Assignment Sample

  • Plagiarism & Error Free Assignments By Subject Experts
  • Affordable prices and discounts for students
  • On-time delivery before the expected deadline

No AI Generated Content

62000+ Projects Delivered

500+ Experts

Enjoy Upto 35% off
- +
1 Page
35% Off
AU$ 11.83
Estimated Cost
AU$ 7.69
Securing Higher Grades Costing Your Pocket? Book Your Assignment At The Lowest Price Now!
X

Introduction: Observe Children To Inform Practice

Access Free Samples Prepared by our Expert Subject Matter Experts, known for offering the Best Online Assignment Help Services in Australia.

This is an assessment activity linked to an individual unit of competency and contributes to the overall assessor judgement of competence.

CHCECE038 Observe children to inform practice

Elements

  1. Observe and interact with children
  2. Seek information from secondary sources
  3. Record and communicate information
  4. Analyse & interpret information and observations
  5. Contribute to curriculum planning

How students participate in assessment

You are required to read and follow the instructions below. Additional instructions may be provided in your Student Handbook and supporting documentation. 

Assessment conditions

Assessment responses must demonstrate a capable understanding and consistent application of knowledge.

  1. You MUST provide responses to all questions at a Satisfactory level
  2. You MUST use the referenced learning materials to guide responses
  3. You can complete the assessment in a classroom setting or self-study environment

Authenticity requirements

You must genuinely attempt to answer each question appropriately to demonstrate your acquired knowledge. Intentionally or unintentionally presenting answers to assessment questions that are another individuals’ work, or the work of a team as your own is considered plagiarism and may result in exclusion from the unit. You should refer to the Student Handbook for further information.

Authenticity Declaration

It is important that you sign and date the Authenticity Declaration to confirm that the responses to questions presented for assessment are your own work. 

ATTENTION

You must include your name and SIGNATURE on this page

Your signature is required to verify authenticity of your work.

By making this declaration:

?

I understand the assessment conditions and how to effectively participate in assessment

?

I understand my responsibility to provide assessment responses that are my own.

?

I understand that, at any time, if it is shown that in this assessment task, I have plagiarised or misrepresented assessment responses, the assessment outcome may be revoked.

Name:

 

Signature:       

Date:

       

 

SUMMARY

RECORD OF ASSESSMENT

Assessor declaration

?

Assessment tasks are authentic and supported by a student declaration

?

Assessors satisfy the Standards for RTOs’ requirements for assessors

This assessment activity has been assessed as:

?Satisfactory?Not Yest Satisfactory?Incomplete

For work deemed “Not Yet Satisfactory” or “Incomplete”, the student has been provided with written feedback below. The assessment may be re-submitted for reassessment. 

Assessor Name:

 

Signature:

Date Received:

 

Date Marked:

Assessor comment/feedback:

 

Resubmit instructions: (for Not Yet Satisfactory or Incomplete assessment outcomes only)

     

 

Assessment instructions

You are required to read the instructions, the question and the referenced learning materials to appropriately answer each question.

Attempting assessment tasks

You are required to respond to each question in the space provided. You can answer each question by typing responses directly into the spaces provided, or by printing and handwriting responses directly into the spaces provided.

Assessment outcomes

The Early Childhood Education and Care training packages are vocational qualifications that are competency based. For each assessment undertaken you will be assessed as Satisfactory or Not Yet Satisfactory. If you are assessed as ‘Not Yet Satisfactory’ the assessor will provide you with feedback regarding what needs to be re-attempted, and the resubmission process.

Reasonable adjustment

You may apply for reasonable adjustment to this assessment activity. Refer to the Student Handbook for further information.

Submitting tasks

Once you have included responses to ALL questions, submit your assessment to the college for marking. Refer to the Student Handbook for information on how to submit assessment activities.

Accessing, saving and/ or printing required readings

You are required to access learning materials throughout the assessment process. These resources provide key information to help you provide appropriate responses to each question.

You are directed to these learning materials via the list below and at the start of each question.

You may choose to save these files electronically, or print them.

Student appeals

You have the right to appeal an unfavourable decision or finding during assessment. Refer to the Student Handbook for further information.

Learning materials and required readings

Students will require access to the following textbooks, readings and websites to provide responses to the questions in this assessment.

 

 

Textbook reference

Kearns, K. (2020)Birth to Big School 5th ed., Cengage Learning Australia, Melbourne.

Chapters 8, 10

 

 

Textbook reference

Kearns, K. (2020) The Big Picture, 5th ed., Cengage Learning Australia, Melbourne.

Chapters 3

 

 

Readings

Australian Children’s Education & Care Quality Authority (ACECQA). (2018). National Quality Standard (A4 Poster)

https://www.acecqa.gov.au/sites/default/files/2018-07/RevisedNQSHandoutA4.pdf

Blue Bay Early Learning Centre.Privacy and Confidentiality Policy

O’Donnell, D. (adapted from) (1999).  Essential Elements of Measurable Annual Goalshttp://kskits.dept.ku.edu/ta/Packets/CreatingIEPs/Essential%20Elements%20Goals.pdf

 

The National Quality Standard (NQS)

The purpose of this question is to demonstrate your knowledge of the requirements of the requirements of the following National Quality Standard and related regulations and laws applicable to this unit.

Question 1

 

Reading

National Quality Standard (A4 Poster) (2018). Australian Children’s Education & Care Quality Authority

https://www.acecqa.gov.au/sites/default/files/2018-07/RevisedNQSHandoutA4.pdf[Or visit the ACECQA website www.acecqa.gov.au National Quality Framework> National Quality Standard, scroll down to download the 2018 National Quality Standard A4 Poster]

Match the NQS element to the descriptor in the table below.

NQS element

  1. 1.1.1 Approved learning framework
  2. 1.1.2 Child-centred
  3. 1.1.3 Program learning opportunities
  4. 1.3.1 Assessment and planning cycle
  5. 1.3.2 Critical reflection
  6. 5.1.1 Positive educator to child interactions
  7. 5.2.1 Collaborative learning
  8. 6.1.2 Parents views are respected

Descriptor

Element

Each child’s learning and development is assessed or evaluated as part of an ongoing cycle of observation, analysing learning, documentation, planning, implementation and reflection

 

Responsive and meaningful interactions build trusting relationships which engage and support each child to feel secure, confident and included

 

Curriculum decision-making contributes to each child’s learning and developmentoutcomes in relation to their identity, connection with community

 

Children are supported to collaborate, learn from and help each other

 

Each child’s current knowledge, strengths, ideas, culture, abilities and interests are the foundation of the program

 

Critical reflection on children’s learning and development, both as individuals and in groups, drives program planning and implementation

 

All aspects of the program, including routines, are organised in ways that maximise opportunities for each child’s learning

 

The expertise, culture, values and beliefs of families are respected and families share in decision-making about their child’s learning and wellbeing

 

 

Planning cycle

The purpose of these questions is to demonstrate your knowledge of the planning cycle.

Question 2

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 359) Figure 10.4‘Six-step planning cycle’

Number the steps in the planning cycle from 1 to 6.An example has been provided to help you answer this question.

Step description

Step number

Question, analyse and interpret information

2

Develop goals for learning

1

Gather information about and observations on the child

5

Review, reflect on and evaluate the process

6

Plan learning experiences or activities

3

Decide on teaching strategies and implement

4

Question 3

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 360) Figure 10.5 ‘The planning process: Planning individual and group programs for children follows a cycle of observe, interpret, plan and implement’

Match the steps in the planning cycle to the descriptors in the table below.

Steps

  1. Collect observations
  2. Interpret (analyse) your observations
  3. Decide on a goal/s
  4. Decide on experience/activity
  5. Decide on teaching strategies and implement
  6. Evaluate the process

Descriptors

Step

·         Does the experience reflect the child's interests and abilities?

·         Does your experience allow for exploration/practice/hands-on learning?

·         What you want the child to do?

Decide on a goal/s

·         Target a specific interest, skill or need

·         Establish how your goal links to one or more domains of development

·         Work out whether your goal reflects your observations and interpretation/analysis of your observations

Interpret (analyse) your observations

·         Is the child demonstrating age-appropriate skills in all domains?

·         What do your observations tell you about the whole child?

Evaluate the process

·         Who, what, where and how the child plays

·         How the child expresses their views – asking questions, sharing ideas

·         How the child responds to challenges/problems

Decide on teaching strategies and implement

·         Would you do anything differently?

·         How did the child respond – what did the child say/do?

·         Were there any unexpected outcomes?

·         What are the child's needs?

Decide on experience/activity

 

·         How will you encourage the child to participate?

·         What do you want the child to be able to do, know, practice or understand?

·         What will you do and say to support, direct or guide the child?

Collect observations

 

Important Information

The purpose of these questions is to demonstrate your knowledge of what information is important and why.

Question4

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 361) Figure 10.6 ‘Reasons for observing and recording information’

There are many reasons why educators observe and record information about children.

 

Match the aim to scenarioin the table below.An example has been provided to help you complete this question.

Aim

  1. To understand the child’s current level of development and developing skills
  2. To understand how children behave in various situations
  3. To determine the emotional wellbeing of the child
  4. To determine whether there is a need for professional assessment
  5. To evaluate the effectiveness of the program in meeting the children’s interests, learning style and skills

Scenario

Aim

Educator Zahir observes Rosa’s emotions when separating from her mother and as she settles on arrival

c

Each week the educators evaluate the program to determine if the planned learning outcomes have been achieved

b

Educator Felix records samples of Fadek’s speech for possible referral to a speech pathologist

d

Educator Max observes Lia’s behaviour as he interacts with others during lunch, when transitioning and during group experiences

a

Educator Kate uses a development checklist and observations to assess each child’s development

e

Question 5

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 358-363)

Select True or False for each statement below.

Statement

True

False

Gathering information about the child’s background is not part of the observation and planning cycle

?

?

Observing groups of children doesn’t contribute to an evaluation of the play and learning environment

?

?

Goals are the planned steps that educators take to achieve a particular outcome

?

?

Observing young children is an easy task

?

?

The learning outcomes in the EYLF are deliberately quite narrow

?

?

Australia does not have a national early childhood curriculum; instead, each service must develop its own curriculum, which must reflect the EYLF or an equivalent framework

?

?

The first stage of the planning cycle is observation

?

?

EYLF teaching practices encompass working from the child’s strengths and building on the child’s existing skills and knowledge by scaffolding learning

?

?

Educators only observe individual children – not groups of children

?

?

Observing children requires educators to draw on their professional knowledge of child development

?

?

Assessment for learning is the process of gathering and analysing information as evidence about what children know, can do and understand

?

?

When observing children, educators focus solely on play

?

?

All services plan and program in exactly the same way

?

?

Gathering information about children

The purpose of these questions is to demonstrate your knowledge of the keyconsiderations for collecting information as part of the planning cycle.

Question 6

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 363)

For each of the following scenarios, select whether the information is a primary or secondary source of information. 

Scenario

Primary

Secondary

The educator observes how Lisa (2 years) separates from her mother on arrival at the service

?

?

The educator talks to her colleague Matt about his experience last year in caring for Ali (2years), who has a developmental delay

?

?

The educator reads a letter from Kieran’s (4 years) speech pathologist

?

?

The educator asks Baakir (4 years) what she did on the weekend

?

?

Based on his observations of Carl (4.9years), the educator meets with a local welfare officer. The educator believes that Carl is at risk of harm

?

?

Question 7

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10(page 365) Figure 10.7 ‘Where and when to observe a child’s development’

 

Referring to Figure 10.7, match the developmental area to the most appropriate examples of where and when to observe.

Developmental area

  1. Emotional wellbeing
  2. Communication/language
  3. Temperament
  4. Cognitive
  5. Fine motor skills
  6. Gross motor skills
  7. Social

 

Examples of where and when to observe

Developmental area

When required to share with others

Communication/language

Manipulating/grasping objects

Emotional wellbeing

Interacting with peers during play

Fine motor skills

 

Transitioning into care on arrival

Gross motor skills

 

Recalling songs and rhymes

Cognitive

Sharing ideas during play – engaging in cooperative play

Social

Outdoor climbing equipment

Temperament

Question 8

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School (5th edition) by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 363-369)

Match each sentence end to the sentence beginning to correctly complete each sentence in the table below.

Sentence end

  1. the child’s age, disposition and individual routine.
  2. on a number of occasions to build up an accurate picture of their development.
  3. children’s relationships and achievements.
  4. to gain an accurate picture of behaviour.
  5. competence, strengths, interests and needs of each child.
  6. the individual profile developed for each child.
  7. additional needs and the referral to agencies for support.
  8. parent and educator communication.
  9. a detailed and authentic ‘picture’ of the child and the group.
  10. interested in learning about.

 

Sentence beginning

Sentence end

All quality early childhood programs base their planning on the individual

b. on a number of occasions to build up an accurate picture of their development.

 

Developmental records should serve as a basis for identification of

c. children’s relationships and achievements

Children should be observed during regular play sessions and daily routines, in different situations, at different times of the day/week and

i. a detailed and authentic ‘picture’ of the child and the group

Keeping developmental records helps educators to build up

g. additional needs and the referral to agencies for support

The observational process used to collect information forms the basis of

e. competence, strengths, interests and needs of each child.

 

From observations, we discover what the child is

f. the individual profile developed for each child

Developmental records should serve as an effective tool in

j. interested in learning about

Where observations are used to look closely at a child’s behaviour, the observations should be conducted over an extended period of time

d. to gain an accurate picture of behaviour.

 

The ‘when’ and ‘where’ to observe will depend to a certain degree on

h. parent and educator communication.

Developmental records should document children’s

a. the child’s age, disposition and individual routine.

 

Question 9

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10

Match the developmental domainto the educator strategy.

Development domain

  1. Emotional development - self-regulation (e.g.,learning to separate from parent on arrival)
  2. Fine motor (e.g.,feeding self, using a spoon)
  3. Gross motor (e.g.,walk up and down stairs)
  4. Cognitive (e.g.,recalling past events)
  5. Social (e.g.,sharing a housekeeping task)

 

Educator strategy

Developmentaldomain

Educators support toddlers to walk up and down the steps of the change table

Cognitive

Each day two preschool children are responsible for working together to set the tables for meals

Gross motor

Educators work with families to plan individual separation rituals for each child

Social

Each day educators in the preschool room talk to children about what they did the previous day or over the weekend

Emotional development

At meals times two spoons are provided for the toddlers so that one can be used by the educator to feed the child while the other can be used by the toddler as they learn to feed themselves

Fine motor

Types of observations

The purpose of these questions is to demonstrate your knowledge of how to make and document meaningful observations and the observation techniques that can be used to gather information.

Question 10

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 372-379)

There a number of ways in which educators can document observations of children. Match each observation technique to its definition in the table below.

Observation techniques

  1. Learning story
  2. Jotting
  3. Anecdotal record
  4. Running record
  5. Language sample
  6. Developmental checklist
  7. Developmental summary

Definition

Developmental area

Short notes made by the observer about significant behaviours or events that are observed

Language sample

A story, recorded after the event, about a moment in time as the child is engaged in some aspect of the daily program

 

Provide an overview or summary of the background information about a child from various sources and a child’s developmental progress from the time of enrolment

Learning story

 

A story about a moment in time in a child’s day, and usually includes photographs, comments, or reflections from the observer

Jotting

 

Documentation which records exactly what the child does and says over a specific period of time. These can be challenging and time consuming.

Developmental checklist

 

A series of age-related sequential skills usually arranged under developmental domains such as motor, cognitive, social, language, emotional and sometimes self-help skills

Running record

A record of what a child says spontaneously when engaged in play with others, typically used when there are concerns about a child’s speech or language

Anecdotal record

Question 11

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School (5th edition) by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 372-379)

Select which observation technique you would use for each of the following scenarios. An example has

been provided to help you complete this question.

Observation technique

  1. Learning story
  2. Running record
  3. Language sample
  4. Developmental summary
  5. Anecdotal record

 

Scenario

Observation technique

Educator Annie was reflecting on a game the children were playing and decided to write an observation about this to use for future planning

e

Educator George needed to prepare an overall summary of each child for the parent as part of an end of year progress report

b

Educator Lisa gathered the notes and photographs she had taken earlier in the day of an artwork a child had completed, and wrote an observation based on them

a

Educator Rob needed to record details from a period of a child’s play as requested by a pediatrician

d

Educator Rebecca was concerned about a child’s speech and was observing the child talking to a peer

c

Types of observations

The following assessment questions require you to demonstrate your knowledge of how to make and document meaningful observations.

 

Question 12

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 372-379)

When writing observations, educators often use past tense or present tense.

  • Present tense is usually used in Running Records, because they are a record of events as they happen.
  • Past tense is usually used in Anecdotal Records because they are written after the event.

For each of the following samples from educator observations, indicate whether they are written in past or present tense.

Scenario

Past

Present

Suzy is playing with Sarah in the sandpit. Tom runs through and knocks down her sandcastle. Suzy begins to cry. The educator comforts her.

?

?

During morning outdoor play, I could hear Kai repeatedly making yelling sounds down in the kitchen. I walked down the hill to see what was happening.

?

?

Kai was standing on the top of the steps in the outdoor play space throwing a ball.

?

?

Kai approaches the obstacle course and walks around the climbing equipment by himself, looking at the equipment.

?

?

Freddy calls over to Ben, ‘Do you want to come and play with the blocks?’. Ben says, ‘Can I use the big blocks?’. Freddy states, ‘No, I need them to build my road.’

?

?

Question 13

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 366 – 368)

The following scenario includes two very different descriptors of Carissa – one is written in a professional manner which is free from bias and negative labelling of children. The other is written in an unprofessional manner.

Read the scenario and answer the questions below.

Professional record

Carissa (4 years 4 months) has a number of challenging behaviours. She has poor self-esteem, poor self-regulation skills, a difficult temperament and is not able to persist at tasks she finds challenging. Carissa is not able to sustain friendships because she is quick to become angry with others when things don’t go her way. When she’s angry Carissa will hit, push, yell and call other children names such as ‘stupid’ or ‘idiot’.

Carissa finds it difficult to enter into a play situation as she is often very demanding. Other children tend to exclude her from their play, saying that Carissa is ‘too bossy’.

Carissa’s mother is aware of Carissa’s challenging behaviour – she has stated that as a single parent she finds herself giving in to Carissa to ‘keep the peace’. Carissa’s mother is very supportive of the current behaviour management program that has been implemented at theservice and has tried to implement similar management strategies at home.

 

Unprofessional record

Carissa (4 years 4 months) has a number of bad behaviours. She has poor self-esteem, poor self-regulation skills, a bad temper and avoids tasks she finds challenging. Carissa is unfriendly, has a quick temper and always likes to get her own way.Carissa is very spiteful – she will hit, push, yell and call other children names such as ‘stupid’ or ‘idiot’.

Carissa has no friends because she is too bossy. The other children don’t like her.

Carissa’s mother knows her daughter is a handful and is happy that the service has implemented a behaviour management program.

  1. List any words or phrases in the unprofessional record that contain bias or negative labelling of Carissa.

 

 

The major unprofessional aspect t ahs adequately implicated with the proper development t of the work that is assigned with the "negative labelling of Carissa".

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Explain why the unprofessional record is considered unprofessional.

 

The evaluation of thje required unprofessional ranges has implied effective changes in the working range. This is the major reason which is implicated to consider "the unprofessional record is unprofessional"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identify and interpret information using a range of observation techniques.

The purpose of these questions is to demonstrate your understanding of how you can use information you have gathered about children to support a strengths-based approach to their learning and development.

Question14

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 380)

Interpretation (analysis of learning) is the next step after observing the child and allows us to make sense of what we have observed. We can then apply child development knowledge and the social context as well as learning dispositions of the child.

List three key points that interpretations might include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three required key points for the interpretation to the child have adequately analysed and amke reflection on the way to understand by the child. the three key aspects in these ranges are " simultaneous interpretation (SI), consecutive interpretation, and whispered interpretation"

 

 

 

Question 15

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School (5th edition) by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 354)

Which three parts of a child’s life do you need to have a sound knowledge and understanding of in order to plan for their development?

 

The valuation of the three required stages has implied and created a reflection on the effective range tio develop work in an effective way. the valuation of the three required stages of child development has included "early childhood, middle childhood, and late childhood"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Question 16

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School (5th edition) by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 370 - 380)

List two ways that educators can capture ‘the child’s voice’ as part of the observation and documentation process. Think about both verbal and non-verbal ways to capture their voice.

The accumulation of the three required ranges used by the educator has implied and made a reflection on the stated range. The two required aspects are "Everyday conversations and Listening to a proper conversation with answering questions"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developing goals for learning

This question requires you to demonstrate your knowledge of ways of questioning and reviewing information to gain better understanding of children’s needs and learning opportunities

Question 17

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 383)

 

 

Reading

Essential Elements of Measurable Annual Goals(1999). Adapted from O’Donnell, D.

http://kskits.dept.ku.edu/ta/Packets/CreatingIEPs/Essential%20Elements%20Goals.pdf

Goals are the planned steps that that educators take in order to achieve a particular outcome.

A goal is meaningful when it describes a behaviour/skill that will have a real impact on the success of a child in currentand future environments. Goals are meaningful when they are based on observations, when they match a child's developmental level, and are based on the progress a child can reasonably be expected to achieve.

  1. Explain why establishing specific learning goals assists educators in the planning process.

 

 

It can be implied by showing an effective learning process and making a reflection on the way to understad all ranges in the defined range. 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. For each of the following scenarios, write one goal for each child that is age appropriate.

The reading Essential elements of measurable annual goals will help you with this task. An example has also been provided to help you answer this question.

Scenario

Goal

Asher (22 months) uses the teapot to make himself a cup of tea. He fills each cup with water from the teapot until the teacup overflows and then moves on to the next cup. When the teapot is empty, he looks towards the educator, holds up the teapot and says ‘more’.

·         To extend on Asher’s interest in cause and effect.

·         To further Asher’s role play/imaginative play skills

·         To provide an opportunity for Asher to explore further water play experiences.

Harry (9 months) is now able to move about- he can roll, creep and pull himself to a standing position. The educator places a basket of objects just out of Harry’s reach. Harry focuses on the basket and gradually moves himself so that he can explore the various materials. He explores each object by grasping, mouthing and banging.

·         To extend Harry's interest in all ranges with “cause and effect”.

 

Gilly (31 months) is beginning to walk across a wide beam. Gilly requests to hold an educator’s hand while walking and walks slowly, putting her feet one beside the other to walk across. Gilly is quite nervous about walking on the beam but is proud of her achievement, smiling once completed.

·         To develop Gilly's role play/imaginative play skills

Robert (4.11 months) is becoming frustrated while attempting to cut with the scissors. He is unsure about holding the scissors and making small snips into the paper. An educator sits beside Robert supporting and guiding Robert to use the scissors to cut the paper

·         To extend Robert's patient at the adverse and effective range

Analyse and interpret information

The purpose of these questions is to demonstrate your knowledge to collect primary and secondary sources of information and analyse and interpret to support children’s learning.

Question 18

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School (5th edition) by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (page 363)

Read the scenario and answer the questions below.

Sources of information

During her programming time, Educator Billie was developing some short- and long-term goals for Abby (3 years), who has a speech delay. She was also planning experiences for Abby to include in next week’s program.

To assist her, Billie reviewed the following:

·         a report from an early intervention service involved in supporting Abby that has recommended educators encourage her use of descriptive words

·         an email received from Abby’s parents updating her about their goals for Abby, and the progress they are seeing at home.

·         her own and other educators’ observations.

Using this information, Billie set some activities which incorporated Abby’s interest in butterflies. Billie sourced some non-fiction butterfly books, some magnifying glasses and butterfly bug blocks, and plastic butterflies, to encourage and support Abby’s descriptive word development.

Billie also discussed her ideas with the other primary educators who worked in the room with Abby. Billie highlighted points from the early intervention report so that the educators understood the focus areas and could share their own ideas and strategies and best support Abby in their interactions.

When she was done, Billie made sure all the documentation was returned to the locked files and saved in a password protected area of the computer.

  1. List three different sources (primary and secondary) of information Billie referred to, to assist with her planning?

The different sources of information Billie has referred to are secondary and primary sources.

 

  1. Why did Billie update the other educators with information from the report?

It is adequately related to other educators with the information as "Children are confident and involved learners" 

 

 

 

 

  1. How did Billie ensure confidentiality of the documentation?

 

Ensuring that the securitization and prevention of the various data and resources of the client have been maintained during the overall documentation.

 

 

 

 

  1. How has Billie used information from the early intervention service when planning?

The development of Nature Treasure Hunt can help in developing an understanding related to ensuring confidentiality with the attached documentation

 

 

 

 

 

Contributing to the planning stage

The purpose of these questions is to demonstrate your knowledge to question and review collected information to contribute to the planning stage.

Question 19

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10(pp. 370 - 380) Kai Case Study Parts 1 - 7

To complete this question, you must refer to the Kai Case Study in your textbook.

  1. Refer to Figure 10.10 ‘Example of a child information summary: Kai’(page 370).

List one  behaviour that tells us that Kai has developed age-appropriate emotional skills.

 

 

Molecular behaviour tells about developed “age-appropriate emotional skills”.

 

 

 

  1. Refer to Figure 10.11 ‘Jottings about Kai’s interactions with his peers’ (pp. 372-373).

List one behaviour that tells us that Kai has a positive self-esteem.

 

Optimistic behaviour tells us about Kai has positive and effective self-esteem.

 

 

 

  1. Refer to Figure 10.12 ‘A running record’ (pp. 373-374).

List one behaviour that tells us that Kai has developed age-appropriate social skills (friendships).

 

Pessimistic behaviour tells us that Kai has effectively developed “age-appropriate social skills”.

 

 

 

 

  1. Refer to Figure 10.13 ‘An anecdotal record of Kai’s fine motor skills’ (page 375).

List one behaviour that tells us that Kai can use his imagination when engaged in play.

 

Trusting behaviour tells us about Kai’s behaviour that has appropriate imagination when it has engaged in the required play

 

 

 

  1. Refer to Figure 10.14 ‘Social/emotional competence checklist’ (page 376).

List one behaviour that tells us Kai is still developing.

 

Envious behaviour

 

 

 

 

  1. Refer to Figure 10.15 ‘An example of a learning story’ that provides insight into Kai’s imagination and collaborative skills(page 378).

Explain why this learning story demonstrates Kai’s leadership skills.

 

 

"Overt and covert" behaviour

 

 

 

  1. Refer to Figure 10.16 ‘Developmental summary’ (pp. 379-380)

With reference to the developmental summary list two behaviours that tell us that Kai has age-appropriate language skills.

 

Trusting behavior

 

  1. Based on Kai’s interest in imaginary play list two experiences/resources that you could plan for Kai

to extend on his learning.

 

 

Voluntary and involuntary behaviour

 

 

 

 

Question 20

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 8 (page292)Figure 8.10 ‘Sample goals for receptive and expressive language’

Chapter 8(page 298) Figure 8.15 ‘Sample goals for cognitive development’

Chapter 10 (pp. 370 – 380)‘Kai Case Study Parts 1 – 7’

Use the information gathered about Kai in the Case Study to add two goals for Kai to the planned experience.

One goal should focus on language and the other on social skills. Your goals must reflect what you know about Kai’s development based on the Case Study.

Two goals for Kai have been included as examples to help you answer this question.

 

Experience Plan

 

Planned for

? Individual child

? Small group

? Large group

 

Child’s name

Kai

Child’s age/Age group

3years 10 months

 

Goals

Language goal 1:  Kai will use descriptive language to describe his ‘Wild Thing’

 

Language goal 2:   The goal should be to focus on behaviour and the other Trusting social skills.

(student to complete)

 

Socials skills goal 1:Kai will interact and share his ideas with his peers as he creates his ‘Wild Thing’

 

Socials skills goal 2: The goal should be to effectively interact with the other associated ranges of share with the other ‘Wild Thing’

 

(student to complete)

 

Date

 

Planned from

? Child’s interests

? Educator (Intentional teaching)

Experience plan

 

Location

? Indoors

? Outdoors

Timing

? Free play

? Group-time

? Routine task

Preparation (how you will set up the experience)

Children will be invited to create their own ‘wild thing’ to add to a wall frieze.

 

 

Equipment required

 

A3 card

Pens, water colours, collage materials/glue, scissors

Large roll of paper for wall frieze

 

Experience description – what you will do

 

Beginning

How will the child/ren be introduced to the experience?

 

Display book ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ and talk about the physical features of the ‘Wild Things’, encouraging Kai/children to describe what they see and what they imagine other ‘Wild Things’ might look like.

Invite Kai/children to create their own ‘Wild Thing’ to create a wall frieze.

 

Middle

How will you support the child/ren?

 

As the children/Kai are working ask open-ended questions to encourage descriptive language and imagination.

Use a clipboard to document children’s/Kai’s comments and take photos of children/Kai as they are working to create a group book about the experience.

 

End

How will you conclude the experience?

 

Invite Kai/children to provide a brief description of their Wild Thing to use as text for the group book.

Assist children to attach their wild thing to the wall frieze.

 

Evaluation of the experience

 

Was the goal achieved? Describe what you saw and heard the child/ren say and do during the experience relating to the goal.

 

Thechildren/Kai enthusiastically created Wild Things.

There was a great deal of discussion about what a Wild Thing should look like. Kai said a Wild Thing should have ‘sharpclaws and teeth; red eyes and a snarly mouth’. He also added that they ‘should be a bit funny because they aren’t really scary. He added ‘I’m going to put glitter on mine and I’m going to give him a funny party hat.’

Throughout the experience Kai interacted with other children, asking them questions, commenting on their work and sharing ideas. When Kai added a party hat to his Wild Thing other children followed his lead.

Kai and the other children provided a comment/description of their Wild Thing to add to the group book.Kai asked me to write: ‘This is Juno. He’s a happy/scary glittery Wild Thing.’

 

Links to the Early Years Learning Framework

? LO1: Children have a strong sense of identity

? LO2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world

? LO3: Children have a strong sense of wellbeing

? LO4: Children are confident and involved learners

? LO5: Children are effective communicators

 

Developmental domains

? Cognitive

? Social/Emotional

? Physical

? Language

 

Future planning

(Follow up activity and description)

 

? Extend the interest

? Vary the experience

 

? Repeat the experience

? Work on a new skill

 

Comments:

Over the next few days I will work with the children to create the group book. Each child will be invited to draw or add a photo of their Wild Thing. I will add the text collected from the children. Together we will read and discuss the book and then place the book in the children’s library.

 

                                 

Changes in child’s/family’s circumstances and confidentiality

The following questions require you to demonstrate your knowledge of the key considerations for collecting information, including confidentiality and privacy requirements.

Question 21

 

Textbook reference

Birth to Big School(5th edition)by Karen Kearns

Chapter 10 (pp. 370 – 380) (Case Study: Kai)

 

 

Reading

Privacy and Confidentiality Policy, Blue Bay Early Learning Centre

Read the scenario and when answering the questions below, consider what you already know about Kai.

Change in family circumstance - Part 1

It’s Monday morning and Kai arrives at Blue Bay Early Learning Centre with his grandparents with sad news. Kai’s older sister was hit by a car on Saturday morning and is in intensive care with head and possible spinal injuries. Kai will be staying with his grandparents for the next few weeks. His parents will have dinner with Kai and his grandparents each evening.

Kai seemed happy to be at the service. He told educator Jack that his sister was in hospital because,‘she got runned over by a big car.’

Kai didn’t show any signs of distress or anxiety until rest time when he asked if he could sit on Jack’s knee. Jack asked Kai about staying with nanny and poppy.

Kai: Me and poppy are going to catch a lizard from his garden.Poppy lets me help feed the birds and wepicked some tomatoes.

Jack: Wow, it sounds like nanny and poppy’s house is very special and lots of fun!

Kai: When is mummy and daddy coming home?

Jack: I don’t know Kai. They are staying with your sister at the hospital, so she won’t be scared. Your nanny told me they’re coming for dinner tonight at nanny and poppy’s house.

Kai nods and snuggles into Jack.

Thefollowing day Kai follows Jack around, refusing to leave his side. He refuses to play with his friends and shows little interest in the small world play Jack set up for Kai focusing on sharks. Kai looks sad and anxious and asks again when mum and dad were coming home.

When his grandparents come to collect Kai, his grandmother tells Jack that Kai is not sleeping well and last night wet the bed (something he hasn’t done for 12 months).

  1. With reference to Figure 10.16 Developmental Summary (pp. 379-380) list two things that tell us that Kaiis finding his new family situation stressful.

 

 

The goal should be to focus on behaviour and other Trusting social skills. 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the second part of this scenario and answer the questions below.

Change in family circumstance - Part 2

The following week the news of Kai’s sister is not good – she remains in a coma and doctors have reported that they are concerned about damage to her brain.

Grandmother:My son is not coping with his daughter’s condition and has started drinking heavily. Kai has been wetting the bed every night. We are all tired and stressed. I’m finding it hard to cope when I can’t get a good night’s sleep.

Jack is feeling uncomfortable and out of his depth.

Jack: Thanks for sharing that with me. It’s a very stressful time for all of you. Would you mind if I shared this information with Kate, our director? She is very experienced and may be able to suggest some things that can help.

  1. With reference to the Blue Bay Privacy and Confidentiality Policy, explain why Jack asked permission to share the information given by grandmother with his Director.

 

 

The goal should be to effectively interact with the other associated ranges of share with the other ‘Wild Thing’

 

 

 

  1. With reference to the Blue Bay Privacy and Confidentiality Policy, give one link to the Education and Care Services National Law Act.

 

It has focus on the behaviour of other associated ranges of share with the other ‘Wild Thing’

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflective practice

This question requires you to demonstrate your understanding of reflective practice and how it can be used by educators in the workplace.

Question 22

 

Textbook reference

The Big Picture(5th edition) by Karen Kearns

Chapter 3 (pp. 89-93)

  1. Reflection is an important daily part of your role as an educator. Read the EYLF definition on page 89 and the Big Picture glossary definition, and in your own words, describe what reflective practice is.

 

It has required to make changes in the "trying to balance work and parenting"

 

 

 

  1. According to the EYLF, what is the intention of reflective practice?

 

 

The development of changes at the effective ranges to balance work. 

 

 

 

  1. In order for reflective practice to be meaningful, educators must take action to improve their practices or develop their skills. What are two of the questionsthe EYLF suggests educators should ask themselves? (page 92)

 

 

The development of changes with maintaining previous responsibilities. 

 

 

 

  1. Read Figure 3.9 ‘Example of a self-reflection – Ella’ on page 92. What did action did Ella take to improve her practices as an educator?

 

 

The development of relationship conflict with the ranges of changes in the adverse effect

 

 

Reference

  • Australian Children’s Education & Care Quality Authority (ACECQA). (2018). National Quality Standard (A4 Poster) Retrieved from: https://www.acecqa.gov.au/sites/default/files/2018-07/RevisedNQSHandoutA4.pdf
  • Blue Bay Early Learning Centre.Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
  • Gegužyt?, G., & Bagdonien?, L. (2021). Value co-creation in engineering service innovation: resources and capabilities perspectives. Central European management journal, 91-123.Retrieved from: https://www.ceeol.com/search/article-detail?id=1014728
  • National Quality Standard (A4 Poster) (2018). Australian Children’s Education & Care Quality Authority Retrieved from: https://www.acecqa.gov.au/sites/default/files/2018-07/RevisedNQSHandoutA4.pdf
  • O’Donnell, D. (adapted from) (1999).  Essential Elements of Measurable Annual Goals Retrieved from: http://kskits.dept.ku.edu/ta/Packets/CreatingIEPs/Essential%20Elements%20Goals.pdf
Recently Download Samples by Customers
Our Exceptional Advantages   Order Now   Live Chat
Get best price for your work

offer valid for limited time only*

© Copyright 2024 | New Assignment Help | All rights reserved